News

Thursday, March 12, 2015

By Meghan Chua

 

Since her 2007 retirement from teaching in the School of Social Work and heading the American Indian Studies Department at UW, Ada Deer has stayed busy advocating for social change and improving people’s lives. As Deer says: “I am proud to be a social worker, and that’s very central to my identity and my participation in the world.” Deer was an instrumental leader in grassroots organization that led to the Menominee Restoration Act in 1973, protecting her own tribe’s sovereignty and setting a precedent for federal restoration of tribal rights. She served as the Assistant Secretary of the Interior during the Clinton administration, and was the first Native American woman to head the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

 

Recently, Deer has been featured as a remarkable woman and social worker in Alice Lieberman’s book, “Women in Social Work who have Changed the World.” As she looks toward planning her 80th...

Thursday, March 12, 2015

By Meghan Chua

 

Alumna Marcia Bradley (MSW '93) has always felt strongly about giving back to the UW School of Social Work. Recently, in addition to annual support, she made a legacy gift to the School as part of her estate planning.

 

School of Social Work alumni and friends can support the School through a legacy gift – a planned, or deferred, gift that will benefit future generations of social work students and faculty.

 

To Ms. Bradley, her charitable bequest is one way to contribute to the field of social work.

 

“It feels good to be giving back in a concrete way to something that I feel will benefit both social work students and the people they serve,” Ms. Bradley said.

 

After 13 years as a social worker at Meriter Retirement Services, Ms. Bradley retired in 2003. Though she has given annual contributions throughout her lifetime, she thinks legacy gifts have a great potential to help the School.

 

“I insisted on doing this because generally, social workers aren’t that well-paid during their careers,” she said. “It’s more likely that they might have some assets in their estate that they could contribute.”

 

Ms. Bradley said her gift could...

Thursday, March 12, 2015

By Meghan Chua

Dr. Jim McGloin (right) poses with Haven McClure, a MSW student

...
Tuesday, March 10, 2015

By Meghan Chua

Photo credit: Lighttruth / Foter / CC BY-NC

 

The UW-Madison School of Social Work has been a pillar of child welfare since the hiring of professor and leading scholar Alfred Kadushin in the 1940s.

 

Now, the School is working with the state’s child welfare professional development system to develop a competency-based training model informed by the latest rigorous research and effective practices.   By improving the quality of training for child welfare workers out in the field, this model aims to promote better outcomes for children and families that encounter county child welfare systems across Wisconsin.

 

The Wisconsin Child Welfare Professional Development System oversees statewide training for the child welfare workforce , under a state grant administered by the School of Social Work. Through this relationship, faculty can contribute their expertise and the latest evidence-based...

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

By Meghan Chua

Professor Daniel R. Meyer of the School of Social Work and Institute for Research on Poverty has received a Kellett Mid-Career Award to recognize his outstanding research career and commitment to teaching.

 

A leading expert in child support policy and its effect on families, Meyer has made large contributions to the body of research and influenced public policy on a nationwide scale.

 

With the award, supported by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Meyer receives $60,000 in flexible research funding. Only nine faculty members around campus received the award this year, each of whom are seven to 20 years past their first promotion to a tenured position.

 

Meyer’s research addresses nationwide trends in individual well-being related...


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